INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAKING SLEEVES

 

Don’t Go Sleeveless!

 

It is crucial that the quilt you enter into the Judged Show has a sleeve for hanging. Here is one method for making them.

 

Many of you already know how to attach a sleeve to the back of your quilt. For IQA’s purposes, please make sure your sleeve finishes to 4 inches.  The most frequently used method of displaying a quilt is to stitch a sleeve, or casing, onto the backing of the quilt so that a rod or dowel can be slipped through it. The rod and sleeve allow the quilt’s weight to be distributed evenly, so that undue stress is not put on any part of the quilt. 

 

1. For the sleeve, cut a strip of fabric 8 1/2 inches wide, 2 inches longer than the length of the quilt edge.

 

2. Turn under a 1 1/2 inch hem at both short ends of the strip. Top stitch.

 

3. Fold the fabric in half lengthwise, with wrong sides together, Fig. 1. 

 

4. If you haven’t attached your binding, place the raw edges along the top edge of the back of the quilt and sew it 1/8 inch from the top, Fig. 2. When you bind the quilt, your binding will cover the stitching on the top. Hand sew the sleeve to the quilt along the bottom edge through the backing and batting, making sure you don’t sew through to the front.* You may also want to stitch the short ends of the sleeve to the backing, as well, making sure to leave the pocket open for the hanging rod.

 

5. If you have already bound your quilt, do steps 1 through 3. Then, sew the long edges together using a 1/4 inch seam allowance. Press the seam allowance open and to the middle of the sleeve, Fig. 3.

 

6. Center the sleeve along one edge of the quilt backing, Fig. 4, approximately 1 inch below the binding, with the seam facing the backing. Sew the sleeve to the quilt through the backing and batting, along both long edges, making sure you don’t sew through to the front. 

 

*You may also want to stitch the short ends of the sleeve to the backing, as well, making sure to leave the pocket open for the hanging rod. This is the quiltmaker’s traditionally preferred method. Textiles conservators, though, recommend taking a stitch through to the top of the quilt every so often so the hanging weight is better supported by the entire quilt and not just the batting and backing.

Click here for illustrations

 

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