Column #77

Quilting with AMD

Pat Cooper poses with her prize-winning quilt. Photo by Sue Kersey
Pat Cooper poses with her prize-winning quilt. Photo by Sue Kersey

Pat Cooper's Broken Star at the Burnet County Fair. Photo by Sue Kersey
Pat Cooper's Broken Star at the Burnet County Fair. Photo by Sue Kersey

When Pat Cooper of Briggs, Texas (a tiny community in Central Texas) took home a blue ribbon at the Burnet County Fair for her hand-pieced and hand-quilted king-sized Broken Star quilt, everyone who saw the quilt was impressed with its beauty.

Had fairgoers known that Pat Cooper is legally blind, they would have been impressed even more. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in both eyes has robbed the 78-year-old East Texas native of much of her vision.

According to Wikipedia, “AMD is a medical condition that usually affects older adults and results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the macula) because of damage to the retina. It is a major cause of blindness and visual impairment in older adults. Macular degeneration can make it difficult or impossible to read or recognize faces, although enough peripheral vision remains to allow other activities of daily life.”

Pat had known that something was going wrong with her sight for some time. Then one night about six years ago, she was watching the evening news and suddenly realized that “the newscaster was wearing two pairs of glasses and his face looked blurry. I knew that wasn’t right!” she said. Eye doctors confirmed her fear and let her know that the situation would not improve—in fact, they told her it would get worse.

“When I found out my sight was going, I thought to myself, ‘Oh my gosh! What am I going to do with all those unfinished projects?’” she laughes. “I knew I had to get busy while I could still see a little bit or I’d never get them all done.”

Pat had started the Broken Star before she lost her vision, but she had set it aside to work on other things, a situation familiar to most quilters. With the encouragement of friends and family, she took up work again on the quilt, making use of the ever-diminishing sight available to her.

“My living room looks like one big visual aid. There are all sorts of lights and magnifying glasses everywhere,” Pat explains, in answer to the question as to how she was able to work on the quilt. “And of course my workmanship is not what it used to be. My stitches aren’t even anymore—some are long and some are short.”

Pat’s stitches were certainly even enough for the judges at the Fair. The blue ribbon was awarded solely on the basis of merit.

No stranger to recognition for her handwork skills, in earlier years Pat won awards at the statewide level when she and her family lived in Louisiana before retiring to Texas. She grew up crocheting and embroidering, but she didn’t start quilting until she was married and she decided to make quilts for her children. She fell in love with the artform. “I just dove into it!” she says.

It would be understandable, based on her physical disability, if Pat had decided to give up quilting. That’s not the way she operates, however. “I’m one of those people who likes to be doing something,” she said. “I believe that you just have to make the best of what life throws at you.”

Her first-place ribbon is proof that Pat Cooper is doing just that!

 

Email this page


Click here to return to top.

Archived blogs:

Column 115: All in the Family
Column 114: The Alabama State Quilt
Column 113: Balloon Quilts of Albuquerque
Column 112: The Family That Quilts Together, Stays Together
Column 111: Two Rivers, Three Sisters
Column 110: Quilters Helping Quilters
Column 109: Community Cookbooks and Fundraiser Quilts—Parallel Histories
Column 108: Quilting to Freedom
Column 107: National Quilting Day
Column 106: The Airing of the Quilts
Column 105: A Call for a National Juneteenth Commemorative Quilt
Column 104: Dominoes
Column 103: 1936 Texas Centennial Bluebonnet Quilt
Column 102: Helen Blackstone, A Texas Quilter
Column 101: Montana CattleWomen Anniversary Brand Quilt
Column 100: 100th Suzy's Fancy Column!
Column 99: Montana Stockgrowers Anniversary Brand Quilt
Column 98: The Tobacco Sack Connection
Column 97: Meet the Sisters Who Are State Fair Quilting Queens
Column 96: The connection between fairs and quilts.
Column 95: Her Mother Pieced Quilts
Column 94: Rebecca Barker’s Quiltscapes
Column 93: The Thread and Thimble Club Mystery
Column 92: The Ballerina Quilter
Column 91: Grandmother's Flower Garden Comes Alive at Texas Quilt Museum
Column 90: Leitmotif for a Lifelong Love Affair
Column 89: Quilting in The Bahamas
Column 88: Joan of Arc: A Quilter's Inspiration
Column 87: Home Demonstration Clubs and Quilting
Column 86: Linzi Upton and the Quilted Yurt
Column 85: A Bounty of Quilts
Column 84: Desert Trader
Column 83: Quilts and the Women’s Liberation Movement
Column 82: Replicating the Past: Reproduction Fabrics for Today’s Quilts
Column 81: Why So Many Quilt Shops in Bozeman, Montana?
Column 80: Southeastern Quilt and Textile Museum
Column 79: 54 Tons of Quilt
Column 78: Ollie Steele Burden’s Quilt Blocks
Column 77: Quilting with AMD
Column 76: Maverick Quilts and Cowgirls
Column 75: The Modern Quilt Guild—Cyberculture Quilting Ramps Up
Column 74: The Membership Quilt—Czech Quilting in Texas
Column 73: Maximum Security Quilts
Column 72: Author: Terri Thayer
Column 71: The Christmas Quilt
Column 70: New Mexico Centennial Quilt
Column 69: Scrub Quilts
Column 68: “Think Pink” Quilt Raises Funds for Rare Cancer Research
Column 67: Righting Old Wrongs.
Column 66: 100 Years, 100 Quilts - More on the Arizona Centennial.
Column 65: Arizona Centennial Quilt Project
Column 64: Capt. John Files Tom’s Family Tree
Column 63: The Fat Quarters
Column 62: Quilt Fiction Author: Clare O’Donohue
Column 61: Louisiana Bicentennial Quilt
Column 60: The Camo Quilt Project.
Column 59: Thread Wit
Column 58: Ralli Quilts
Column 57: Preschool Quilters
Column 56: The Story Quilt
Column 55: Red and Green Quilts
Column 54: On the Trail
Column 53: Quilt Trail Gathering
Column 52: True Confessions: First Quilt
Column 51: Quilted Pages
Column 50: Doll Quilts
Column 49: More Than a Quilt Shop
Column 48: Las Colchas of the Texas-Mexico Border
Column 47: Literary Gifts
Column 46: A Different Way of Seeing
Column 45: Sampling
Column 44: Hen and Chicks
Column 43: A Star Studied Event
Column 42: Shoo Fly Pattern
Column 41: Awareness Quilts
Column 40: Tivaevae
Column 39: UnOILed UnspOILed Coast Quilt Project
Column 38: Katrina Recovery Quilts
Column 37: Quilted Vermont
Column 36: The Labyrinth Quilt—A Meditative Endeavor

See other archived columns here

facebook Follow QuiltFestival on Twitter Follow QuiltFestival on YouTube Instagram

Back to top

7660 Woodway, Suite 550 • Houston, Texas 77063 U.S.A.
Telephone (1) 713.781.6864 • Fax (1) 713.781.8182 • e-mail: shows@quilts.com
To request a free informational postcard, contact us.
Please specify which show you are interested in.