Column #102

Helen Blackstone, A Texas Quilter

Longhorns on the Chisholm Trail
Longhorns on the Chisholm Trail

In August of last year, quilter Helen Blackstone passed away, eight months past her 100th birthday.

A charter member of the Austin Area Quilt Guild, Helen came from a creative family (her brother, Robert Gage, was a noted artist) and she enjoyed designing her own quilts.

She made quilts by the dozens, gifting them to family members and friends, and quilting was her favorite means of artistic expression, although she loved music, drama, visual arts, and literature as well.

Graduating from the University of Texas at Austin with Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees, Helen taught second grade for 30 years in an elementary school that served a low-income area. Many of her students did not speak English as a first language.

Nevertheless, Helen managed to instill in them—as she did her own children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren—a belief in the importance of education and an appreciation for the arts and culture. At her funeral, one of those students from half-a-century earlier spoke eloquently about the impact she had on his life and those of his siblings.

Helen was strong-willed, and she definitely had a mind and opinions of her own. She had a presence about her that could quiet unruly children without saying a word, and she enjoyed a lively give-and-take in conversation.

In the time that I was privileged to know her, I was always surprised by what could be called her genteel feistiness. She was fun to be around.

Helen loved history (she was the historian for her family church) and it was history that inspired her to create the quilt for which she gained the most acclaim, her Longhorns on the Chisholm Trail.

The longhorn is a traditional Texas symbol, as well as the mascot of her alma mater. Every year since 1972, the small town of Lockhart, Texas (where Helen and her husband owned a nearby farm), has held the Chisholm Trail Roundup to commemorate the beginning of one of the major Texas cattle drives of the late 1880s.

In the early days of the Roundup, a quilt contest was part of the festivities. And although Helen did not enter the contest, she was motivated to research the history of the cattle trail and design her quilt, which she created in 1979.

Each element in the quilt was chosen to emphasize the longhorn’s symbolism. Years ago, Helen described those choices to me this way:

“The printed greenish fabric represents the lush green grass on which the cattle were fattened before being driven up the Chisholm Trail. The rust-colored flowered print represents the rocky areas of the trip and the wildflowers passed along the way. The beige fabric suggests the clouds of dust the passing herds kicked up. And the different-colored longhorn in the bottom corner of the quilt—that’s like me—it’s the maverick!”

When referring to cattle, the term “maverick” means an unbranded calf that has become separated from its mother. It also refers to person who is an independent thinker and who often chooses not to conform to the accepted views on a subject. Helen apparently identified with the latter definition, no doubt with a twinkle in her eye.

Rest in peace, Helen. You will be missed.

 

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Archived blogs:

Column 117: How WWI Changed the Color of Quilts in the United States
Column 116: Wagga—The Bushman’s Quilt
Column 115: All in the Family
Column 114: The Alabama State Quilt
Column 113: Balloon Quilts of Albuquerque
Column 112: The Family That Quilts Together, Stays Together
Column 111: Two Rivers, Three Sisters
Column 110: Quilters Helping Quilters
Column 109: Community Cookbooks and Fundraiser Quilts—Parallel Histories
Column 108: Quilting to Freedom
Column 107: National Quilting Day
Column 106: The Airing of the Quilts
Column 105: A Call for a National Juneteenth Commemorative Quilt
Column 104: Dominoes
Column 103: 1936 Texas Centennial Bluebonnet Quilt
Column 102: Helen Blackstone, A Texas Quilter
Column 101: Montana CattleWomen Anniversary Brand Quilt
Column 100: 100th Suzy's Fancy Column!
Column 99: Montana Stockgrowers Anniversary Brand Quilt
Column 98: The Tobacco Sack Connection
Column 97: Meet the Sisters Who Are State Fair Quilting Queens
Column 96: The connection between fairs and quilts.
Column 95: Her Mother Pieced Quilts
Column 94: Rebecca Barker’s Quiltscapes
Column 93: The Thread and Thimble Club Mystery
Column 92: The Ballerina Quilter
Column 91: Grandmother's Flower Garden Comes Alive at Texas Quilt Museum
Column 90: Leitmotif for a Lifelong Love Affair
Column 89: Quilting in The Bahamas
Column 88: Joan of Arc: A Quilter's Inspiration
Column 87: Home Demonstration Clubs and Quilting
Column 86: Linzi Upton and the Quilted Yurt
Column 85: A Bounty of Quilts
Column 84: Desert Trader
Column 83: Quilts and the Women’s Liberation Movement
Column 82: Replicating the Past: Reproduction Fabrics for Today’s Quilts
Column 81: Why So Many Quilt Shops in Bozeman, Montana?
Column 80: Southeastern Quilt and Textile Museum
Column 79: 54 Tons of Quilt
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Column 76: Maverick Quilts and Cowgirls
Column 75: The Modern Quilt Guild—Cyberculture Quilting Ramps Up
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Column 67: Righting Old Wrongs.
Column 66: 100 Years, 100 Quilts - More on the Arizona Centennial.
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Column 63: The Fat Quarters
Column 62: Quilt Fiction Author: Clare O’Donohue
Column 61: Louisiana Bicentennial Quilt
Column 60: The Camo Quilt Project.
Column 59: Thread Wit
Column 58: Ralli Quilts
Column 57: Preschool Quilters
Column 56: The Story Quilt
Column 55: Red and Green Quilts
Column 54: On the Trail
Column 53: Quilt Trail Gathering
Column 52: True Confessions: First Quilt
Column 51: Quilted Pages
Column 50: Doll Quilts
Column 49: More Than a Quilt Shop
Column 48: Las Colchas of the Texas-Mexico Border
Column 47: Literary Gifts
Column 46: A Different Way of Seeing
Column 45: Sampling
Column 44: Hen and Chicks
Column 43: A Star Studied Event
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Column 41: Awareness Quilts
Column 40: Tivaevae
Column 39: UnOILed UnspOILed Coast Quilt Project
Column 38: Katrina Recovery Quilts
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Column 36: The Labyrinth Quilt—A Meditative Endeavor

See other archived columns here

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